(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Better elevator service : issued in the interest of all who own, care for or operate elevators."

OS 





< 



'f 



BETTER 

ELEVATOR 



v 






SERVICE 



OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY 

OFFICES IN ALL PRINCIPAL ClflES OF 7H£ WORLD 



Copyright iqib by 
OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY 



BETTER 

ELEVATOR 

SERVICE 



ISSUED IN THE INTEREST 
OF ALL WHO OWN, CARE FOR 
OR OPERATE ELEVATORS 



OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY 

OFFICES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES OF THE WORLD 






. 



■*- (A 






■ I' 1 , 



U*\\ 






_ - rj I * " 1^"" _■¥■ 

iiHJisSs* 



L 



lUiffSJJJiiriiJ!!" 1 !! 

Illll! 



mm 11 

■jiiiiiiiii?"' 




X 




I! : tl 




I 






1 



Vniinni 







II II H; hi h 








•in 









, 



IT 





Abo\c — The Y'onkers \ Y Works of the Otis Elevator 
Company. Other factories are located at Harrison, N. J 
Buffalo. N. Y., and Quincv 111. 



Below — The Otis Building, New York. In this Building 
are located the General Offices and the Service Warehouse. 



BETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



A WORD ABOUT OTIS SERVICE 

HE supremacy of Otis Elevators— in 

T| design, in manufacture and in operating 
qualities — has been for many years, and 
is today, universally acknowledged. 

Considered from the standpoint of 
elevator apparatus generally, Otis Elevators are 
conceded to need the least amount of mechanical 
attention. But like any piece of good machinery, they 
do need proper care and systematic attention if they 
are to be kept up to their highest operating efficiency. 

Recognizing its obligation to provide facilities for 
this care and for the expert inspection of all types of 
its elevators, everywhere, the Otis Elevator Company 
some years ago began to establish its own service 
officer throughout the world. There are now over 
one hundred such offices located in the United States 
alone, each office carrying in stock all necessary eleva- 
tor accessories, supplies and parts, ready for immediate 
shipment. 

At these offices one or more factory-trained 
experts are stationed — men who are thoroughly famil- 
iar with elevator construction and operation; and 
continuous telephone service is maintained in order 
that these Service men may be reached promptly, at 
anv hour of the day or night, or on Sundays and 

Holidays. 

Periodical inspections can be arranged for with 
these offices at nominal rates under standard con- 
tracts providing for weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, bi- 
monthly or quarterly inspections. Full details of such 
service will be gladly furnished by the nearest office. 

Pages 2Q and 30 give the location and present 
address of all Otis Service Offices in the United States 
and Foreign Countries. 



TTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 




An Otis Controller Parts Cabinet. 



OTIS CONTROLLER PARTS CABINETS 




HE Otis Controller Parts Cabinet has 
been devised to facilitate and quicken 
repair sen ice in the event of unexpected 
breakdowns or worn parts on the elevator 
controller. 



It 



is a compact, shallow box, strongly made of 
reel and contains all essential emergency wearing parts 
of the type of Controller furnished with the elevator 
machine installed. 

It is generally hung on the wall of the motor or 
engine room, so that the engineer in charge, by re- 
ferring to the descriptive catalogue that goes in the 
cabinet, can quickly determine the part needed to 
replace the worn mechanism on the controller and 
locate instantly that part in the Cabinet. 






BETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



Duplicate parts should be ordered at once to 
replace the parts removed, so that the Cabinet is at 
all times complete and ready for other renewals. 

With one of these Cabinets in the engine room, 
minor changes of parts can be made immediately and 
without impairment of the elevator service. 

These Cabinets are now being furnished for prac- 
tically all the standard types of Otis Controllers. 
Manx of them are listed below. 

Any of the Otis Service offices can supply the 
Cabinet required for your elevator controller. 



DIRECT CURRENT 

2 DD Controller 3 FD Controller 

HB " bF " 

AP 6 FD 

HKS " MFL 4 B 

3 F " MFL 4 C 



i v 



* * 



% h 



ALTERNATING CURRENT 

2 DA Controller 2 VAS Controller 

3 DA " OVB 

2 E-AC " " 2 SAS 

iVR " 1-1/2 SS 

2 VS 2 ss 



- - 



4 4 



* * 



fc % 






ETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 




ELEVATOR LUBRICATION 

VERY Building Owner, Manager and Engi- 
neer is vitally interested in the economical 
maintenance and proper operation of his 
elevators. A good many, however, fail to 
appreciate thoroughly the importance of 

proper lubrication and its direct bearing upon the 

operating efficiency of the elevators. 

Elevators need special lubrication and special 
lubricants. While most users do not buy inferior or 
cheap oils, they frequently obtain oils which are not 
of the correct constituents for use as applied. 

Otis Lubricants are produced with the one idea 
of supplying high grade lubricants, strictly for elevator 
apparatus— each lubricant compounded for a particu- 
lar purpose. 

There are eleven of these lubricants. They were 
adopted only after a careful study of what was required 
and analvses of tests covering a period of years. Lon 
practical experience has proven that these lubricants 
can be recommended, without reservation, for the ex- 
clusive use of elevator operators or owners. A full 
supply is carried in stock at each Otis Service Office. 

The illustration on the opposite page shows the 
Otis lubricant cans in full color. The can contain- 
ing each particular lubricant is easily recognizable 
by the color of its label and this has proved an 
added convenience in the handling of Otis lubricants. 

On Pages 10 to 13 is a more detailed description 
of each lubricant, its qualifications and its purpose. 



8 





OTIS 

ELEVATOR 

LUBRICANTS 

Prepared for Elevatoi 

Purposes Onl\ 








ETTER 



LEVATOR SERVICE 




Ball Bearing Lubricant 

A non-corrosive compound free from 
acid and of a consistency to properly and 
thoroughly lubricate either slow or high 
speed ball bearings. 

Supplied in five pound cans only. 




the brake's refusing 
sequent burning out 



A. C. Brake Magnet Oil 

This oil (used in connection with alter- 
nating current brake magnets) is for 
dissipating the heat generated in the 
brake magnet coil. It is extremely im- 
portant that this oil be used, as the 
brake is designed for its use and other 
oils will gum and stick the core of the 
magnet, or in other ways vary the speed 
of the brake plunger. Some cases have 
been called to our attention where the 
use of other oils has been the cause of 
to release with the current on. with con- 

This oil has superior 



_ _ o of the motor coils. 

insulating qualities as well as being free from acid and, there 
fore non-corrosive. 

Supplied in one gallon and two gallon cans. 




Traction Bearing Oil 

This oil is used for lubricating the 
bearings of the gear less traction ma- 
chines, where solid bearings have been 
furnished. The regular motor bearing 
oil should not be used for this purpose, 
as it has been found to be entirely 
too light. 

Supplied in two and five gallon cans. 



IO 



TTER ELEVATOR 



R V I C 




Worm Gear Lubricant 

This oil has been found to give the 
best results for worm gear lubrication. 
It consists of high grade vegetable 
castor oil mixed with a mineral cylin- 
der stock. This compounding proces 
is a matter of experiment with most 
oil retailers and it was onh after rests 
covering a period of several years that 
Otis Worm Gear Lubricant was devel- 
oped to a point of proper consistent and quality 

Supplied in two gallon and five gallon can- 




Motor Bearing Oil 

An excellent quality ol high sp 
bearing oil. It is used for motor beai 
ings and for small worl mg parts where 
a light oil is required. I his oil will nol 
gum or stick nor will the heat devel- 
oped in high speed bearin thicken 
the oil to make it useless. 

Supplied in one and two gallon cans. 




Plunger Lubricant 

A white grease which has been 
found very satisfactory for lubricat- 
ing plungers and the cylinders of 
horizontal hydraulic elevators. 

Graphite plunger grease is some- 
times used but this is not necessa 
unless the surfaces have become 
scored or rough. 

Supplied in five and ten pound 
cans. 



1 1 



TTER ELEVATOR SE 



RVIC 




Guide Lubricant 

Particularly desirable for both wood 
and steel guides, when automatic lubri- 
cators are not used. It is less apt to 
dry or gum than the average lubricant 
and will not run on the guides. 

Supplied in five, ten and twenty-five 
pound cans. 




Compression Cup Grease 

A lubricant that is particularly suited for 
lubricating sheaves and all bearings where 
grease cups are furnished. It is free from 
acid and will not harden in the cups. 



Supplied in two. five and ten pound cans. 



Hydraulic Lubricant 

This is a specially compounded soluble oil, being free 
from acid or other injurious alkali. Will not corrode linings 
or wearing parts and will materially prolong the life of cup 
leathers or packings. 

To obtain best results, one gallon of this lubricant is used 
to every one thousand gallons of water. After first charge 
this proportion can be increased as demands warrant. One 
charge will lubricate the water for a period of from four to 
six months, depending upon the service required of the 
elevators. 

Supplied in five gallon cans, half barrels and barrels. 



I 2 



BETTER ELEVATOR 



R V I C E 




Buffer Oil 

This oil has been selected after being 
found entirely suitable for the purpose. 
The graduated parts of Otis Buffers have 
been proportioned for the use of this 
oil and their successful operation depends 
upon the circulation of oil through the oil 
chambers. 

It is very essential that buffers be 
occasional!} inspected to ascertain il they 
arc filled with oil, otherwise rust or cor- 
rosion affect the operation of the plunger. 

Supplied in two gallon and f\\^ gallon 
cans. 



Wire Rope Lubricant 

A compound especially manufactured 
for this company and which has been 
found particularly satisfactory for lubri- 
cating and preserving wire ropes. This 
compound distributes itself throughout 
the rope and lubricates each individual 
wnc it also penetrates the core ot the 
rope' and serves to prevent moisture from 
collecting at the core and rusting the 

internal wires. Only carefully selected oils are used, oils that 

wiil neither drip nor gum. 




Supplied in one gallon cans. 

gallon will lubricate 2000 ft. 

1800 






t ( 






4 1' 






1 c 



1 1 



c t 









t 4 






l600 
I400 
12O0 



i * 



I € 



i c 



t i 



i " 

2 
5 r/ 

8 

3 " 

4 

7 tf 

8 

1" 



Wire Rope 



t t 



I 1 



( t 



i i 



< X 






I i 






All of the above lubricants can also be obtained in 
barrel and half barrel lots. 



13 



ETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 




INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CARE 
AND OPERATION OF DIRECT 
CURRENT ELECTRIC ELEVATORS 

PEN the main line switch when preparing 
to clean, oil or adjust any part of the 
machinery. Keep all parts of the ma- 
chinery scrupulously clean. A pair of 
hand-bellows should be used to clean all 
parts of the apparatus that cannot be conveniently 
reached. All other parts must be wiped clean. 

Always keep the gear case filled to top of worm- 
shaft The stand pipe on the side of the gear case 
should be used to determine if sufficient oil is used. 
To remove the sediment and grit from gear case, drain 
oil at least twice a vear and wash the housing with 
kerosene oil. Always refill the housing with fresh oil. 

Use only Worm Gear Lubricant for the Worm 
and Gear. 

The motor bearings have automatic feed rings, 
which should always turn freely and the oil chamber 
must be kept sufficiently full of oil to insure the oil 
rings dipping into it. 

Use only Otis Motor Bearing Oil for these Bearings. 

The worm shaft bearings are automatically oiled 
from the gear case, and the oil should be allowed to 
drip slowly through the worm shaft gland to insure 
perfect lubrication of this bearing. Use drip pan to 
catch this oil. The worm shaft stuffing box must 
be kept packed with soft square braided flax packing. 
The gland adjusting nuts must be tightened evenly to 
prevent binding of the worm shaft. 






ETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



day . 



Lubricate the drum or sheave shaft bearings every 

Use only Otis Compression Cup Grease. 

The secondary sheave bearing of the worm 
o eared traction machines should be given the same care 
and attention as the motor bearings; the oiling chains 
should turn freely and the bearings properly supplied 
with oil. 

Use only Otis Compression Cup Grease. 

The governor bearings and gears must be lubri- 
cated frequently. The governor pawl bearings should 
be kept well oiled and should always be perfectly 
free, so that the pawls will fall against the governor 
rope when the latch is raised. Keep all pins and 
moving parts well oiled. 

Use only Otis Compression Cup Grease for this 
purpose. 

Keep the compression grease cups on the vibrator 
sheaves of drum machines filled and sufficient lv com- 
pressed to feed the lubricant. 

Use only Otis Compression Cup Grease for (his 
purpose. 

This also applies to sheave bearing boxes of the 
drum type machines. 

The cables on all types of elevators are subjected 
to varied strains and unusual wear and the lubrication 
of cables has been a problem not easily solved. Cables 
on all types of elevator machines should be lubricated 
to obtain the greatest possible service. 

Use only Otis Wire Rope Lubricant for this purpose 

All of the safety devices on the car frame and car 
should be examined at frequent intervals and all 
working parts kept clean, well lubricated, and free 
from rust. 



15 



ETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



Both wood and steel guides are used for guidin 
the car and counterweights. Some Engineers have 
preferred to install automatic lubricators which auto- 
matically feed oil on the guides. However, where 
lubricators are not used, we would recommend the 
use of Otis Guide Grease for this purpose. 

Examine the oil buffers under the car and coun- 
terweight of traction machines frequently, and be 
sure that they are filled with oil to height of the pet 
cock. As these buffers are designed to operate with 
oil of a certain consistency, it is very necessary to 
use Otis Buffer Oil for proper operation of the buffers. 

To prevent sparking at the commutator when 
adjusting or renewing the brushes, fit them to a full 
bearing with a strip of fine sand paper; never use emery 
cloth. This may be done by placing the sand paper 
between the commutator and the carbons (sand side 
against the carbon) and drawing it back and forth 
by hancl. The carbons must always project beyond 
the holders, so that the holder will not bear on the 
commutator. Brushes should be staggered to dis- 
tribute the wear evenly on the commutator. The 
brush springs must be adjusted so as to insure good 
contact between the carbons and the commutator. 
In case the commutator becomes rough, it may be 
smoothed by holding a piece of fine sand paper, never 
emery cloth, against the surface while the machine 
is running, after which it should be wiped clean. A 
canvas pad should alwavs be used for cleaning the 
commutator; never use waste. Sand papering the 
commutator should be avoided as much as possible. 
Polishing them when new with canvas, after bein 
sure that the brushes are at their neutral point and 
properly bearing on the commutator, brings about 



[6 



ETTER ELEVATOR 5ERVIC 



the fine blue finish which improves the commutation. 
It is most essential to keep commutators free from 
dirt and oils. This applies to the head of the com- 
mutator and the mica insulating ring at the base of 
the bars, as well as to the surface of the commutator. 

Adjust the brake springs to properly hold the load. 
Set the brake shoes so that they just clear the brake 
pulley when released. If a piece of thin paper can 
be passed between the shoes and the pulley, the clear- 
ance is sufficient. The brake pulley and brake shoes 
must be kept clean and dry. Under no circumstances 
use oil on the brake pulley or brake shoe. Adjust tht 
brake contact on top of the brake magnet casting so 
that its contacts are sufficiently open to break the arc 
when the brake is fully released. When necessarx to 
remove the brake shoes for cleaning or repairs, the 
empty car should be left at the top of the hoist way. 
with the counterweights securely blocked up in the pit 

Examine the bolts between the drum neck and the 
drum or driving sheave and tighten them if necessarx 

Set the stop collars on the automatic stop sxvitch 
of the drum machines so that the car will stop at the 
level of the top and bottom landings with normal 
loads. The car should be frequently tried on the auto- 
matic stop to see if the collars are properly adjusted, 
as the automatic may be thrown out of adjustment, 
due to stretching of cables. Remove the cover from 
the top of the automatic switch on the machine fre- 
quently and clean and adjust the contacts. 

The contacts on the slack cable switch on the 
drum machines and of the hatchway limit switches on 
the drum and traction machines should be frequenth 
cleaned. 

Keep the metal and carbon contacts on the con- 
troller clean, and free from pits or blisters. They 



17 



ETTER EUEVATOR SERVICE 



should be frequently smoothed with sand paper and 
have a good even bearing when in contact. The 
springs should also be adjusted to obtain this result. 
Plungers of magnets should be bright and smooth 
and should be tried by hand to make sure that they 
do not stick. Rub a little flaked graphite on these 
plungers occasionally ;• never use oil on them. 

Oil sparingly the pins and moving parts of the 
different switches with Otis Motor Bearing Oil. See 
that all nuts, lock nuts and cotter pins are in place 
and secure. The cover of the car switch should be 
removed at least once each week to see if the con- 
tacts are in good condition and lubricated and adjusted. 
Keep all parts of the switch clean to prevent dirt 
accumulating and causing short circuits or burning 
of the contacts. The small grease pot provided with 
\\ ick wiper at bottom of car switch should be lubri- 
cated with vaseline occasionally, so as to keep the 
segment clean and lubricated at all times. 



18 



TTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 




OPERATION 

LWAYS close the Hatchwo D t 
securely, fa /v moving the C tr Switch. 

To start the car move the car switch t< 
the extreme right or left |" siti< >n I lie si \ 
speed i ntacts are intended for st in 

nly, The up or down magnets on the c ntroller will 
then make contact and the accelerating contacts will 
operate to automatical cut out the armature st- 
ance as the speed of the motor increases, and unde 
normal load will all operate within a period I >m 
three to lour seeonds, if properh adjusted, giving 

dual and easy acceleration oi the car i lull speed. 
I he accelerating magnets must he set to operate con- 
st utively and at equal intervals 

IV) stop the ear move the car switch slowh I 
ward the center when the car is three or lour t it 

the landing and finally to the stop position fc u the 

landing. It is best not to center the car switch rapid! 
or reverse it suddenly, inasmuch as this pi 
unnecessary arcing of the contacts on the coi i >llei 
A little experience will enable the operator to del 
mine the best way i bring the car to a stop lev* 
with the landing, under varying o tditions oi ling. 
\l\vavs keep the ear switch lever in its central ti< 

wl the elevator is not in service, as it is aut 1- 

call} locked in this position 

In case the Car Switch ( ntering Spring is brok i, 
it should be immediately replaced. 

If the elevator fails to start from the < r switch, 
look for open circuits at the safetx switch in the cai 
mam line fuses, operating fuses on the c ntrollei 

ntroller contacts, contacts in automatic switch and 
slack cable switch on drum machines, and govern 



! I 



TTER ELEVATOR SERVIC 



switch on traction machines and final hatch limits; 
also examine all bearings to see if they are dry or hot 
from lack of oil. 

If the elevator fails to stop when the car switch 
is in the stop position, open the safety switch in the 
car and if this fails to stop the car, it will be automa- 
tically stopped at the top or bottom of hatch by 
the automatic devices provided for this purpose. 

To start a car operated by hand rope or hand 
wheel move the hand rope or hand wheel quickly in 
one direction or the other, so that good contact is 
assured between the contacts on the controlling device. 
The operating device should in every case be moved 
the full limit of its travel to insure good contact. 

To stop the elevator, center the hand rope or 
hand wheel when the car is close to the floor level. 
If the car fails to start when the hand rope or 
hand wheel is moved to its proper position, be sure and 
center the operating device at once and then look for 
the cause of trouble, as above. 

If the car should stop suddenly while descending, 
throw the car switch on center. Then have the 
building engineer examine the machine and determine 
the trouble. If the safety device has operated he 
should be careful to see that, in case of drum machines, 
the slack cable is taken up on the safety operating 
drum under the car and that these cables are not 
crossed and are in their proper grooves, before releasin 
the safety device. The hand wrench for releasing the 
safety device should not be kept in the car, but in 
the hands of the building engineer or attendant in 
charge of the elevators. It is important to remove 
all kinks from the Governor and Safety Operating 
Cable. Also to examine the Governor Cable to determine 
if it has been sufficiently damaged to require the instal- 
lation of a new cable. 



20 



ETTER ELEVATOR SERVIC 



It is also very important that all slack in the 
hoisting cables be taken up before the safety is re- 
leased, as otherwise the car would drop till brought 
up by the cables, and this fall and sudden stop might 
snap the cables. This slack is taken up by slowh 
turning over the machine till the cables are taut. 
Be sure that the cables go back on the drum in the 
proper grooves. 

Safe Lift Machines are equipped with a locking 
bar on each end of the safety plank. When these 
bars are thrown out in their extreme position the\ 
engage with clips on the guide rails at each floor. 
This locking device is operated with a wrench through 
the corner of the car platform. Before operating the 
bars, move the car platform a few inches above the 
desired floor, and by means of the socket wrench 
throw the bars out in their extreme position. Then 
lower the car very slowly until the platform comes 
to rest securely on the clips. 

Be sure that the bars have a full bearing on the 
clips. After loading the safe on the car, raise the 
car a few inches off the clips, and by means of the 
socket wrench move the bars to their extreme inward 
position; be sure that the bars are clear of the clips. 
Under no circumstances attempt to load a safe or other 
heavy object on the elevator platform without lanclin 
the car platform on the clips as above noted, and after 
loading the platform do not attempt to lower or raise 
the load, except as noted, until the bars have been 
withdrawn and are entirely clear of the clips. 

Never attempt to leave the car while it is in motion. 
Always stop the car at the top and bottom landings 
with the car switch, the same as at intermediate 
landings. 



2 I 



BETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 




INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CARE AND 
OPERATION OF ALTERNATING 
CURRENT ELECTRIC ELEVATORS 

LTERNATING current electric elevators 
are similar in design to the direct current 
type, excepting that alternating current 
electrical apparatus is used. The i :i gear- 
less traction and the 2:1 rope geared 

traction machines are not at present being built to 

operate on alternating current circuits. 

The operation of Alternating Current Elevator 
Machines is the same as noted for Direct Current 
Machines. 

The cleaning of Alternating Current Machines is 
the same as noted for Direct Current Machines. 

The oiling of Alternating Current Machines is the 
same as noted for Direct Current Machines excepting 
the Brai This brake being housed in an oil tight 
housing, is flooded with oil. It is very important 
that the brake magnet case be kept well filled with oil. 
In view of the design and requirements of this brake, 
it is important to use only Otis Brake Magnet Oil in 
this Housing, otherwise the plunger will become 
gummed, and stick, and retard the operation of the 
brake magnet, tending to burn out the brake coil or 
magnet. 

When ordering parts for any part of the elevator, 
mention the number of the machine as stamped on the 
Motor Name Plate. Also give Part Number and 
Name, as is shown in Part Catalogues. When possible 
give the name of original purchaser. 



a 



BETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



Wearing parts are carried in stock for immediate 
shipment and all orders will be promptly executed, 
provided the part desired is fully described or refer end 
made to original numbers. When it is necessary to 
refer to factory record of original installation, a slight 
delay in shipment is occasioned. 



*3 



ETT E R 



LEVATOR 



R V I C E 



USEFUL INFORMATION 

Area and circumferences of circles within 
ranges used in general Elevator Practice. 



Inch' 


Inches 


in 


Inches 


Inches 


O 

in 


Diameter 


Circumferenc 


Area 


Diameter 


Circumierence 


Area 


3 tf 

4 


1.356 


.442 


30" 


q4. 248 


706 . 86 


l" 


3. 141 


-5 


n" 


100. 531 


804 . 2 5 


ii' 


4-712 


1 . 767 


34" 


106.814 


qo7.q2 




b.283 


3 '4 


jb" 


H3-oq7 


1017.00 


ih" 


7-854 


4 q 1 


38" 


1 iq. 381 


1 134. 10 


{" 


Q-4-4 


7.07 


40" 

M * 


125. 664 


1256.60 


3§" 


1 . qqb 


q 1 12 


42" 


131-047 


I385.4O 


4" 


1 2. 566 


12.57 


44" 


1 38. 230 


I 520. 5O 


4 *> 


14 1 3 7 


15 qo 


4b " 


144 513 


I 60 i . qo 


5" 


m 708 


iq J 


48" 


150.796 


1 8oq . 60 


- 

5 


17.279 


23 " ' 


5.0 " 


157. 080 


1063.50 


6" 


18.850 


28 : 7 


52" 


163. 363 


2 1 2 3 . 70 


6J' 


20.420 


3^ 18 


54 


1 6q . 04q 


22qo. 20 


7" 


2 1 . qq 1 


38.48 


56" 


175. q2q 


2463 . 00 


7 


23 . 562 


44. 18 


58" 


182. 21 2 


2642 . 10 


8" 


3 


50 2b 


60" 


188. 4q6 


2827. 40 


8|" 


26. 704 


V "4 


62 " 


iQ4-77q 


301Q. 10 


q" 


28. 274 


63 -02 


64" 


201 . 062 


3217.00 


qV' 


2q.845 


7O.88 


66" 


207.345 


3421 . 20 


io" 


31 .416 


78 .54 


68" 


2 1 3 .628 


3631 .70 


IO* " 


32.987 


86 ) 


70" 


2iq.qi 1 


3848.50 


11* 


34-558 


05 03 


72* 


226. IQ5 


407 1 . 50 


IX*' 


3.6 1 28 


103 . 87 


74" 


232.478 


4300. 80 


12" 


6qq 


1 13. 10 


-h" 


238. 761 


4536.50 


12^" 


3q. 270 


122.72 


78" 


245 .044 


4778.40 


13" 


40 . 84 1 


13 73 


80" 


251 .327 


5026. 50 


13-4* 


42. 412 


[43. 14 


82" 


257.61 1 


5281 .00 


u" 


43.082 


iS3.q4 


84" 


263 . 8q4 


5 54 1 . 80 


'4i " 


45553 


165. 13 




270. 177 


5808.80 


15* 


47- 124 


176 71 


88" 


276. 460 


6082. 10 


16" 


50. 265 


20 1 .06 


qo" 


282. 743 


6361 . 70 


18" 


56.540 


254-47 


q2" 


28q.02 7 


6647 . 60 


20" 


62.832 


314 10 


q4" 


2q5 • 3 10 


6q30- 80 


22" 


6q . 1 ] 5 


380. 1 3 


96" 


301. 5q3 


7238. 20 


34" 


75 -3q& 


452-39 








26" 


81.681 


530-03 








28" 


87.965 


61575 









24 



BETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



CABLE 
Breaking Weight 

Dia Strain in Tons per Foot 



CHAINS (Crane) 
Breaking Weight 

c Strain in Tons per Foot 





6 x iq Iron Cable 


1 ff 
i 


3 » 


24 .22 lbs. 


5 " 

16 


9 
1 N 


3Q -3Q " 


: // 


9* tf 
16 


4.7 .50 


7 ft 
16 


5 " 
ft 


6.0 .62 


1 V 

2 


9 

3 n 

4 


8.5 ,8q t4 


9 
1 6 




1 1 . 8 1 . 20 


8 


3 


b x tq Cast Steel Cable 


1 1 

! f 


s 


4.8 : 2 lbs. 


1 


I 


8.4 -3Q 


1 '" 


9~ 
1 6 


10. . 50 




** 


12 5 ,6.2 " 


I 

1 


3 " 
4 


17 5 .8q 


1 ' 


T ff 


23 .0 1 20 
8 x iq Cast Steel Cable 




, * 


4.2 .20 lbs. 




2 


7- 3 35 




9 
16 


s.- .45 ;; 






IO. Q ■ 56 




4 


15 3 So || 




ft 

8 


20. 1 . 08 
Tiller Rope 




8 


1 . 70 - ib lb 




7 
16 


2.70 .21 




l r/ 

2 


3 15 .28 " 




9 ff 


3.60 35 




5 

8 


4 *5 .43 





1 . 7O 


. 7 5 lbs 


2 . 50 


1 .00 


3 1 


1 . 50 


5 .CO 


2 . 00 


70 


2 50 


8.40 


3 jc 


10. 30 


4 IO 


12. bo 


5 . 00 


1 5 IO 


6 10 


17 .to 


11 70 


40 


8 j5 " 


2 5 JO 


Q.OO 


So 


10 t<: 



Diameter of circle: 
Circumference of circle 
Area of circle : 



Surface of sphere : 
Cubic inches in sphere 



3 1 s 3 1 

3 • 1 4 1 ' 
7854 
3.141b 

S230 



Multiply circumference by 
Multiply diameter b\ 
Multiply square of diameter by 
Multiply square of diameter by 
Multiply cube of diameter by 

Capacity of cylinder in gallon^ Multiply area in inches by length of stn 

in inches and divide b 2 j 1 the number of 
cubic inches in a gallon. 
One cubic foot of Anthracite coal weighs 
about 53 pounds. 

A sal Ion of water weighs 8.33 pounds; a 
cubic foot of water weighs 62 pounds. 

A bar of steel 1 inch square and 1 yard 
long weighs 10.: pounds. 



Weight of coal : 



Weight of water 



W ;ht of steel bar: 



25 



BETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



Safe Working Pressure in Cylindrical Shells of 
Boilers, Tanks, Pipes, etc. in Pounds per Sq. In. 



Thick. 

of steel 
in 16th 
inches 

I 
2 

3 

4 

5 
b 

7 

8 

9 

io 

i i 

12 

13 
U 

"5 

ib 



24 



30 



J 6 • 5 

7: .0 

IOQ. 
45-8 

L -8 2 .. 3 
218.7 

2QI-7 
l8.1 

364. 
401 .0 

437-5 

473 -9 
5 IO -4 
J 46-9 

15*3- 



2Q.2 

58.3 

87. < 

1 1 b . _ 

1 4^-8 
[75.0 

: 4 . 1 

J. 3 

162.5 

201.7 
320.8 

7Q.: 
58.3 

J 7 • 5 



Diameter of Cylinder in Inches 



3 b 



24.3 

48. b 

72.Q 

97.2 

[21.5 

145.8 

1 70.1 

1Q4-4 
218.8 
243.I 

267.4 
lOl .7 

3 ib.o 

J40.3 
564.6 



38 



23.0 
46.1 

69 . 1 
Q2.1 

115.1 

1 3 8 . 2 
ibi .2 
184. 
207.2 

230.3 

J-3 

76.3 

2QO-3 

322.4 

$45 -4 
368.4 



40 



2 1 .Q 
43.8 
65.6 

87.5 

ioq.4 
131.3 

153-1 
175.0 

iqb.q 

218.8 

240.6 

1 62 . 5 

>4-4 

306.3 
328.1 

;50.o 



42 



20.8 

41.7 
62.5 

83.3 

104.2 

125-0 
145.Q 
166.7 
187.5 
208.3 
2 20. 2 
25O.O 
- "O.Q 
2QI .7 
3I2.5 

333-3 



44 



46 



IQ 

3Q 

5Q 
79 
99 

1 IQ 

'30 
I5Q 

1 70 
iq8 

218 

238 

258 

278 

2Q8 

318 



9 
8 



5 

4 

3 



1 
o 

Q 

7 
6 

5 

4 

3 

2 



iq.o 
38.0 

57-1 
76.1 

Q5-I 
1 14. 1 

133.2 

152.2 

171 .2 

iqo.2 

2OQ.2 

228.3 

247.3 

266.3 

285.3 

304-4 



48 



18.2 
36.5 

54-7 
72-q 
qi .1 
ioq. 4 
127-6 
145.8 
164. 1 
182.3 
100.5 
218.7 
337.0 
255.: 
273.4 

2QI.7 



50 



17-5 
35.0 

5^-5 
70.0 

87.5 
105.0 

1 21.5 

140.0 

157-5 

175.0 

IQ2.5 
2IO.O 
227.5 
245.0 
263,5 

:8o.o 



52 
16.8 

33-7 
50.5 

67.3 

84.1 
101 .0 

117.8 
134.6 

151.4 
168.3 

185.1 

201 .q 

218.8 

235.6 

252.4 
ibq.2 



Longitudinal Seams Double Riveted. 

14,000 \ thickness in inches 
Calculated from Formula P = — 



Diameter in inches 
Factor in above table = 5 to 1 



Pressure in Pounds per Sq. In. 
for Different Heads of Water. 



Head 

in 
Feet 

o 
10 
20 
30 

40 

50 
60 

70 

80 

QO 



OFi 



1 



Ft. 



4 

8 

1 2 

17 
2 1 

25 



330 

660 

)o 

320 

50 

q8o 



30. 3 10 
34. 640 
38070 



4 

9 

1 3 

12 

30 
35 

3Q 



44 3 
0Q3 

423 

753 
083 

413 

7- 
073 

403 



2 Ft 



3 



Ft. 



.88' 

5 l O 

0- 5 - 
1385 
18. 186 
22.516 

2 b . 84 
31.17 

35.506 
30-836 



4 Ft. 



5 Ft. 



I . 12Q 1 732 
5.62Q 6.O02 

q.Q5q 10.392 

14 28914-723 
i8.6iq iq.052 

22.94Q23 382 

27. 27c- 17. 712 
3 1 . 6oq 32.042 

35-93936. 372 

40. 26040 702 



2 

6. 
10. 

15- 
IQ- 

23. 

28. 

52 

36. 

41 . 



165 

40 5 
15 

155 

485 

815 

145 

475 
805 

135 



6 Ft. 



2 

6 

1 1 

15 
IQ 

2 4 
28 

32 

37 
41 



7 Ft. 



/ 



598 

. Q28 

. 258 

588 

.qi8 
.248 

•578 
.qo8 
.238 
.568 



3 

7 
1 1 
16 
20 

24 

20 

33 
37 

42 



03 1 
3b 1 
6qi 
02 1 

35i 
68 1 

01 1 

34i 
671 

OOl 



8 Ft. 



3 

7 

1 2 

16 
20 

25 

20 

33 

38 

42 



464 

794 
124 

454 
784 
I 14 

444 

774 

104 

436 



q Ft. 



3-8q7 
8. 22 

12.557 
16.887 

21.317 
15.547 

29.877 

34.207 

38.537 
42.867 






ETTER ELEVATOR SERVIC 



k % i % 






ELECTRICAL FORMULAE 

Voir: Unit of pressure. 
\mpere: Unit of current flow. 
Ohm: Unit of resistance. 
Amperes = Volts -7- Ohms (Ohrm law | 
Volts x Amperes = watts. 

40 watts = one horsepower. 
Kilowatt = 1000 watts, known as I\\\ 
1 mil = .001 inch. 

To obtain watts: multiply H P. b\ 746 

H P divide watt^ b\ 746 

H. P. multiply Kw. by .746 

Kw. : " H. P. by r.341 

Wires and Wiring 

Size of Conductor — let D equal the distance that a current of 1 ampei 
is to be transmitted and e equal volts drop in the transmi jsion, and I equal 
current in amperes; then the cro ion of the copper conduc r in circular 

mills (c. m.) is found b\ the formula 

11.6DI 

c. m. equal- — — 

e 

Example: to carry 50 Amperes 120 ft. with 5 volts drop would requin 

21 I' 1 \ UGX 50 

c m. equals , this 

5 

equals 25Q20, and upon referring to the table on Page 28 it will be found 
that No. 6 wire will be required. 

The formula applies only to a direct current circuit or to an altc 1 ji 
current circuit where the power factor is unit or in other words, there is n 
lduction in the circuit. 

The wiring table gives data concerning copper wire with safe carry in 
capacity according to the National Board of Fire Underwriters. The cap ity 
is entireh independent of the voltage drop. 



27 



ETTER ELEVATOR 



R V I C 



x 



Table of Dimensions, Weights and Resist- 

Pure Copper Wire (Bare) Brown 

Resistance at 75° F. 



ances 

& Sharp Gauge. 





— 


V- 


u 


•-> _, 


- H 


if.X 


u-C 


5 £ 


1 g 

S.s 

115 2 


X 



S 03 









X 
X 
X 

oooo 

ooo 

oo 

c 

1 

2 

J 

4 

5 

'■ 

7 
8 

Q 
10 

i i 

I 2 

1 3 

U 

[6 

17 
18 



a 3' 

<o 







.035 

• 9° 3 
.8qi 

.8iq 

-28 

$qo 

4600 
. 400 

3648! 
.3248 

2893 
.2576 

. 2 2Q4 

204 
l8lQ 

. ]620 

- 144^ 
. I284 
■ I 144 
. IOl8 
.OQO7 
.0808 

071Q 
.064O 
.0570 
. 0508 

.045 2 
.O4O3 



IOOOOOO 
800OOO 
700000 

booooo 
500000 
400000 
250000 
2 1 1 000 
167805 

13307Q 

105538 

83004 

6637} 
5 2 6 3 

4I"4 
33 102 
26250 
2081 
1650Q 
130c 
10381 
8234 

65 2Q 
5 178 
4 106 
3256 
2582 
2O48 
1624 



4?. - : 

- 9 

o _o o 



3050. 
2440. 
213s 
1830. 

1525- 
i 220. 

762 . 

63Q. 3 

507.0 

402 . 

318.8 

2^2.8 

200. 5 

I5Q.O 

I 2 6 . I 

IOO. o 

7Q-3- 

62 QG 

40 88 
3 q i 
31 .37 

2 4 . 88 

IQ 73 
15.65 

12.44 
Q.84 

7.81 

6. IQ 

4.QI 



4: u G 
-- o 3 

My o 
G'~Q, 

— u 



J 



•3*75 
.4100 

.4080 

. 5 4 Oo 

.6550 

.8200 

1 . 32 

1. 56 

1 .Q7 

2 4Q 

3 >4 

3 99 

4 QQ 

6. 2Q 

" 93 

10.00 

12.61 

15-9° 
20.05 

25. 28 

3 1 38 
40. 20 

50. 6q 

63. q 1 

80.38 

101 .63 

1 28. 14 

l6l . 5Q 

203 . -0 



It", ^ -C 



05 100. 
76100. 
66600 . 
57100. 
47500. 
38050. 
23750. 
20383. 
16165. 
1 2820. 
1 o 1 66 . 
8062 . 3 

6393-7 
5070. 2 

402 1 . o 

3188.7 
2528. 7 

2005. 2 

1 50,0.3 

1 26 1 3 

1000. o 

7Q3- 18 
62Q.02 

498 . 83 
jq5-6o 

3 2 1 . 02 
248. 81 

197-3° 

156 4 7 



- 

« o 

£ <s o 

- CO — 

•-4: , w 

a: a 



III 



.0105 I 

.01313 

.01501 

.01751 

.02101 
.02627 

04203 
. 04Q06 

06186 

.07801 

.09838 

. 1 2404 
. 1 5640 

. IQ723 

. 24869 
.3136] 
.39546 

4987 1 
.62881 

.7q28i 

1 .0000 

1 . 2607 

1 . 58Q8 

2. 0047 

2. 5278 

3 - 1 1 5° 
4.01Q1 

5 . 0683 

6. 301 1 



650 

550 
500 
450 

4 00 

325 

240 

225 

175 

15° 

125 

1 00 

q° 
80 

70 

55 

5° 

38 

35 
28 

25 

23 
20 

17 
15 

6 



4-1 ZJ C 

o oT 
a F" y 

u<6 



1000 
840 
760 
680 
600 
500 
3 5° 
3 2 5 

275 

225 

200 
150 
t25 

IOO 

9° 
80 

70 

54 
50 

38 
30 

27 
25 

23 
20 

10 



28 



BETTER ELEVATOR 



RVIC 



DIRECTORY OF OTIS OFFICES 

UNITED STATES 



Akron, Ohio. 99 Ash Sir 
Albany, N. V., 40 Heaver Street 
Altoona, Pa., 1018 Sixteenth Avenue 
Atlanta, Ga., Kontz Bldg. 
Atlantic ( ity, N..J., 1+ North Presbyter- 
ian Avenue 
Augusta, Ga., 9th & Reynolds Streets 
Hallimore, Md., Equitable Building 
Birmingham, Ala., 1918 Morris Ave. 
Boston, Mass., 84-35 India Street 
Brooklyn. N- Y., 49 Willoughby Street 
Buffalo. N. V.. Fran! Huron Ms. 

i edar Rapids, la., 830 S. 19th Street 
Charleston^ ( 155 Meeting Street 
Charleston, W. Va., 19 Hale Street 

battariooga, Tenn., 819 Cherry Street 
Chicagi 111., GOO W. Jackson Blvd. 
( in aati, Ohio, 305 East Fourth St. 

land, 0.. 526-32 Leader-News Bldg. 
i olumbia, Si ' . 1124 Hampton Ave. 
Columbus, Ohio, 230 North Third St. 
Dallas, Texas, 417 S. Akard Stro ' 

enporl, towa, 218 East Third St. 
D.i\ ion, Ohio, 509 1 Third Street 
Denver, I ol., 1626-28 Glenarm Street 
D^ Moines, Iowa, 409 Wesl Fifth St. 
Detroit, Mich., West Fort J< Fifth Sts, 
Duluth, Minn 29 W. Michigan Street 
II Fas,,, Tex., 209 Caples Building 
Erie, Pa., 1509 Sassafras Mreet 
1 ort Wayne, Did., 1220 Lake Avenue 
I orl Worth, Tex.. 215 Dan Waggoner Bldg. 
Fresno, Cal., 9 ! H" Street 
'.rami Rapids, Mich., 7 Oakes Mreet 
Harrisburg, Pa., 28 South Third Street 
Harrison. X. J., 1st St. & Railroad Ave. 
Hartford. Conn., 76 Market Street 
Hoi Springs, Ark., 773 Park Avenue 
Houston, Texas, 3118 I man Strn l 
Indianapolis, ln<l., 22 S. C ol Avenue 
Jacksonville, Ma., 210 F. Forsyth ~'reet 
Kalamazoo, Mieh., 236 F. South Street 
Kansas City, Mo., 1918-20 Wyandotte St. 
Knoxville, Tenn., 325 Walnut Street 
Lincoln, Neb . 1016 "K" Stre. I 

Little Rock, Ark.. 401 Center Street 

Los Angeles, Cal., 218-20 F Fourth St. 
Louisville, K\ 206 West Main Street 
Lynchburg, Vn„ Hotel Carroll 
Macon, Ga., 367 Second Street 
Memphis, Tenn . 292 Monroe Avenue 
Milwaukee, Wis., 115-117 Huron Street 



Minneapolis, Minn.. 412 6th \ ■ —South 
Mobile, Via. ! i6 Si Mich Streel 
Montgomery, Ala., 1<m; North IVrrv St. 
Nashville, Tenn,, I Is -is Id Ave.- -rth 
New Haven, Conn., L24 Meadow Street 
New Orleans, La., 852 < arondelel Streel 
New York, N.Y., llth Ave. & 26th Sire 
Norfolk, Va., 5 11 ( ove Str< el 
Oakland, Cal., 318 Dalzell Bldg 
i Oklahoma < ity, < U la., Indiana Bldg 
Omaha, Neb., 1200 Jackson Street 
Peoria, 111., .540 S. Adams Street 

Philadelphia, Pa.. I Mh & £ ts Streets 

Pittsburgh, Pa.. I -.'in Ke< d m Bldg 
Portland, Me., 195 I ore Str< el 
Portland, Or.-., isj Burnside 3tre< I 
Providence EL I . I I J2 S Main Stre< 

Heading, Pa , .ill Prim Street 

Richmond, Va., I I South Tenth Street 
Rochester, N. Y-, 8 & [0 Jo Street 
Rockford. III. 5 North Horsman Strei 

- icramento, Cal., ] "nun Bldg. 
5l . Joseph, Mo , 109 3 ?th 51 

. Louis, Mo., Locust & .' frd Sts. 
Si Paul, Mi n lieoi i Bldg. 

Sail Lake Citj I 606-9 Ju Bldg 

5 lh vntonio, Tex , 610 Market Streel 
San I i go, c at. :. r, I [ml en Bldg 

m Francisco, I 'al S800 Stockton 51 

Savannah, Ga., 18 State Streel — West 

niton, P i . 108 I ra nklin Aven i 

die, Wash., 1 IQ '- 1 I 'ourl h Avenue 

Shreveport, La., 501 Continental Bank 

Building 
Sioux t ity, low 14 Iowa Bldg. 
Spokane, Wash !28 S W iinuion SI 
> 1 1 r i n I Id, Mass., 224 Worthington Si 
Springfield, Mo., 219 N I ibell 31 

- 5 r:i. u ... \ ^ ;4\\ est I i'> el te St. 
Tacoma ; Wash., Perkins Bldg 
Tamp i I I ' .' I n t iss Street 
Toledo, Ohio l Tenth Street 
Trenton, N .1 . 821 Carter* I Avenue 
Tuba. I II I '08 Unitj Bldg 

l tica, N. \ . 10 ( atharine Streel 

'W hington, I >. C IQ ■ 8 M< tropolitan 

Bank Build i i 

Wheeling, W. \ Schmu Fitdg. 

Wichita, Kan., 123 Easl First Street 
Wilmington, Del., loth & Market Str 
Worcester, Mass.. -II Main street 
Youngstown, Ohio, \ 20 F. Boardman St. 



FOREIGN 



ARGENTINE 
Otis Elevator Company 
Buenos Aires, Calle Suipacbi. f>24 
Rosario de Santa Fe. Gral Mitre 735 



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 
Otis Aut/ugswerke Gesellschaft, 

beschrankter Haftung 
Vienna, IX, 6 Wahringerstrasse 
Budapest, V, 3 Vecseyutca 



mit 



2Q 



ETTER ELEVATOR SERVICE 



BELGIUM 

Compagnie Beige des Ascenseurs Otis 
Bniss Chaussee d'Anyers 102 
Antwerp, L6 Hue Gerard 

Rue Frangois Musin 41 

BRAZIL 

Middle town Car Company 
Rio de Janeiro, 10!) Rio Bran* 

Ernesto De Castro & Co. 
- , Paulo, Rua Boa Vista 26 

CANADA 
Otis-Fensom I levator Company, Ltd, 
Man. Office: 50 B St., Toronto, Out. 
Calgarv, Alberta, T< & Persse Bldgs., 

822-5 Ninth Ave. W. 
I .imonron. Uberta, 10187 104th Str< 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, 146 Hnlli> S reel 
Montreal, P. Q, 368 5l Jam* s 5 reet 
I l.ttawa, Ont., 254 Que< : reet 
Qui , P. Q. Dominion Bldg., 126 S 

Peter Si reel 
Begin:., Sasi • bawan, Cor. Eleventh A^ 

\ Lome Si reel 
Vancouver, B « . 1152 Mainland A 
Victoria, B. C . 526 < hancery Lane 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, S16 < 'umberland 
Avenue 

CHILE 
Spencer & Waters 
Santiago, Pasaje Ralmaeeda No. 11 
Valparaiso 

CHINA 
G. S. Jensen 
Sbani . 13 Nanking Road 

CUBA 

Zaldo & Martinez 
Havana, 26-28 Calle O'Reilly 

DENMARK 
Otis Elevator Company 
< openhagen, Puggaardsgade No 2 

FRANCE 
Ateliers Otis-Pi f re 
Paris, I T 4 li . de Courcelles 
N 9 Hue Gounod 
Lyon, 28 his rue Doumoulin 
Marseille PL Thiars 

B eaux, !* cours de ( rourges 



GERMANY 
Otis Aufzugswerke Gesellschaft, 
mit beschrankter Haftung 

Main Office & Factory: Wittenau, 
Berlin Mirau-Ecke Innungstrasse 
( ologne, Deichniannshaus 
Hamburg, 27 Schwanenwik 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 
Von Harnm-Young Co. Ltd. 

Honolulu 

HOLLAND 
Fred Stieltjes & Co. 

Amsterdam, 745 Keizersgracht 

JAPAN 
American Trading Company 
Tokio, No. 1 Itcbome, Yuraku-Cho 
Kobe, No. 99 Kitaxnacbi 

MEXICO 
Otis Elevator Company 
Mexico City, Plaza Santos Degollado 8 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 
["rank L. Strong Machinery Co. 
Manila, 64-68 Calle Echague 

RUSSIA 
Otis Elevator Company 

Petrograd, 21 Nievsky Prospekt 
Moscow, Miasnitskaja 24 

Chr. Brun & Son 
Warsaw, Hotel Bristol 

SPAIN 

Ateliers Otis-Plfre 

Madrid, 82 Ronda de Atocha 

SWITZERLAND 
Otis Aufzugswerke 
Zurich 

Factory: Waedenswil 

URUGUAY 

Otis Elevator Company 

Montevideo, San Jose 867 



ASSOCIATED COMPANY FOR THE BRITISH EMPIRE 



UNITED KINGDOM 
Waygood-Otls Limited 
Head Office & Worl London, Falmouth 

Road 
Brighton, 1 Grai on Mansions, Grafton 

Street, ECingscliffe 
Birmi tarn, 63 Lionel St, 

ardiff, 6-' t Johns Sq. 
< rlasgo^ , 116 Hop< Si . 
Leeds, - ndard Buildings 
Livi rpool, Royal Liver Bldgs., Pier Head 
Manchester, 90 Princess St, 
Margate, 1 Cam Brea, Bath 

Cliftonville 
Newca Pilgrim St., Pilgrim 

Plymouth. H ( leoi Street 
Belfast, 1-1 1 I ounta - , 
I >ublin, 5 Leinster St. 

AUSTRALASIA 

Standard-Waygood Hercules Ltd. 

Sydney, Australia, 77 King St. 

Adelaide. S. Australi 



Road, 
House 



Auckland, New Zealand 
Kane, Queensland 
bristchurch, New Zealand 
Dunedin, New Zealand 
Hobari , Tasmania 
Melbourne, Victoria 
Perth, W. Australia 
Wellington, New Zealand 

SOUTH AFRICA 
Waygood-Otis (South Africa) Ltd. 
Johannesburg, 109 Main St. 
Durban, I London, Port hhzabeth, 

Town, H M. Ross & Co., Strand St. 
IN HI A AND FAR EAST 
tmbay, Turner Hoare & Co., Elphin- 
stone Circle 
I oloffibo, Walker Sons & Co. Ltd. 
1 dcutta, Balmer Lawrie & Co., 103 

Clive Street 
Hong Kong, Dodwell & Co., Ltd. 
Rangoon, Bulloch Bros, & Co. Ltd. 
Singapore, Central Engine Works, Ltd. 



30 



12Ke WORLDS 

mmmmmm 




WORD , /br 

m sssa 



MM 






ELEVATCJR'SAFETY 












«?0 R M A ^59